PUBLICATIONS

  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2011). To Be or Not to Be - That is the Question: Is a DRB Right for Your Project. Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education & Practice (3)1,10-16.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2010). Success, Failure, and Referrals. Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education & Practice (2) 3, 139.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2009). A Case Study as to the Effectiveness of Dispute Review Boards on the Central Artery/Tunnel Project. Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education & Practice, (1)1,18-31
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2006). The Effective Mediator. Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education & Practice (132)4, 326-333
  • Harmon, K.M.J. & Cole, B. (2006). Loss of Productivity Studies – Current uses and misuses: Parts 1 and 2. Construction Briefings, 8 & 9 (August and September).
  • Vestal, A. & Harmon, K.M.J. (2004). Teaching Conflict Resolution to Culturally Diverse Preschoolers. ACResolution, (4)1, 18-19.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2004). Cost Effective Strategies for Arbitration: A few strong instincts and a few plan rules. Journal of Management in Engineering, (4)4, 148-153.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2004). Dispute Review Boards: Elements of a Convincing Recommendation. Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education & Practice, (130)4 289-295.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2004). Dispute Review Board Effect on Bid Prices. Cost Engineering, 46(6), 30-34.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2003). Construction Conflicts and Dispute Review Boards: Attitudes and Opinions of Construction Industry Professionals, Dispute Resolution Journal, 58(4), 66-75.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2003). The Effectiveness of Dispute Review Boards, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management 129(6).
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2003). Resolution of Construction Disputes: A Review of Current Methodologies, Leadership and Management in Engineering 3(4), 187-201.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2003). Conflicts between Owners and Contractors: A Proposed Intervention Process, Journal of Management in Engineering, 19(3), 121-125.
  • Schaub, C.E. & Harmon, K.M.J. (2003, May). Dispute Review Boards and the Central Artery Tunnel Project. The American Bar Association, Forum on the Construction Industry Annual Meeting, Boston, MA.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2002). Mediation: Satisfaction in the Process and Outcome. Construction Briefings, 6.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2001). The East Side Access Project - Changing the Paradigm for Disputes. Forum 6(2), 1+.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2002). The Role of Attorneys and DRBs. Currents 7(1)6-9.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2001). Dispute Review Boards - The Power to Cure. Forum, 5(2), 1-9.
  • Harmon, K.M.J. (2001). Pseudo Arbitration Clauses in New York City Construction Contracts. Construction Briefings, 7.

Articles by Kathleen M. J. Harmon, Ph.D.

A Case Study as to the Effectiveness of Dispute

The most prevalent use of the Dispute Review Board (DRB) process in the United States to date is the Central Artery/Tunnel project located in Boston,Massachusetts. A DRB is a three member panel jointly chosen by the contractor and owner that is present throughout the course .

Claims avoidance techniques

This paper provides best-practice recommendations on contract administration procedures to help a project team successfully bring or defend against change order requests, claims and litigation. These recommendations include advice on document management, schedule analysis, cost control and negotiation.

Dispute Review Boards: Elements of a Convincing Recommendation

This paper will discuss the dispute review board (DRB) process and in particular the settlement recommendation and the elements thereof that may induce contractual parties to resolve their conflict. The recommendation is a document issued after the contractual parties bring a dispute to the DRB panel that they have failed to resolve. To lay the foundation for the issuance of a recommendation, the DRB process will be briefly discussed.

Dispute Review Boards Effects on Bid Prices

The topic of the effectiveness of dispute review boards as the impetus for reducing a contractor’s bid pricing was a part of the first US study exploring how those within the construction community perceive the effects the dispute review board(DRB) process has on conflicts within the construction industry.

Effectiveness of Dispute Review Boards

A Dispute Review Board (DRB) is a panel of three respected, experienced industry professionals jointly selected by the owner and contractor of a project and established at the beginning of a construction project. It meets regularly at the job site to be briefed on the work, the schedule, and any potential issues in dispute.

To Be or Not to Be- That Is the Question: Is a DRB Right for Your Project?

Dispute review boards (DRBs) have been used on a wide variety of projects both in the United States and abroad. However, this alternative dispute resolution1 methodology has been around for over 3 decades and as of 2006 has been used on over 1,434 projects according to the Dispute Resolution Board Foundation; therefore, now is the time to consider whether the benefits of a DRB outweigh its potential downside.

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